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  • Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    I thought I might share a first sketch of a rare historic artifact with anyone who might be interested. I’ve just been up to Cumbria to record a partly timber-framed chimney from the late 16th/early 17th century. The sketch will be invaluable as the daub just bounced the camera flash right back at me.

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    A sketch will always give more instant information than a photograph. I use a similar process when I research historical aircraft before building the model.

    A picture records the whole but the sketch gives an insight into the construction and answers the question, “How shall I make it”

    Good stuff, Allan :clap:

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    Thanks Don. The building I recorded also has an early example of ‘look no nails’ in the form of a door that has wooden hinges and is held together with wooden dowels. I think the aim is that I produce a measured, exploded, view to explain the construction method; for now the sketch will have to do.

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    Were there iron pintles for the hinge? Not unlike a ships rudder of the period. I like the extensive stop champhers to most of the parts. Were the trenails taken right through then split and wedged?

    I notice that the vertical planks of the door have ‘v’ joints.
    Is this before the rabbet plane was developed? I have a very old tool which will form a deep groove in the edge of a plank. I believe it was called a ‘scratchtooth’, or something like.

    Fascinating stuff.

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    There was no iron in the construction at all Don. The hinges were tenoned inot mortices in the simple door post and trenailed through. The boards were also trenailed to the battens; square nails in round holes. They didn’t look split but had been flattened with a mallet as far as I could tell.

    The tool used to cut the V-shaped groove may well have been one like yours. I think the door dates from the late 16th or ealry 17th century, like the smokehood/timber stack. It may have been moved (easy to do as it is firmly attached to a door post; itself attached to a simple lintel and opposing post)as it isn’t very tall and it might be expected to be larger if it had been a main door into the buidling.

    The door and the partly timber chimney have been enough to make the building rate a II* listing.Its also become a favourite place for barn owls to nest in.

    Allan

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    I can’t quite get my head round the all-wood hinges – a sketch is obviously needed!

    It probably squeaked a lot in between being lubed with goose fat. Kept the owls awake too. I’m being silly – it’s been a long day :yawn:

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    I think the difficulty you are having is likely to be common; that’s one reason why the person who is writing up the door, and the building, was so keen to have it drawn.

    The hinges are U-shaped wooden pieces that are tenoned and pegged into mortices in the door post. I sketched several details on site to try to get the image that get worked up into a proper record.

    The owls probably didn’t mind the door as much as the lights we kept flashing through the place while we measured it 😥

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the sketch which explains the hinges perfectly! 😀 Send your bill.

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    I won’t send a bill Don but would ask that you write to your MP to ask him/her to ‘giz a job’. :mozilla_tongue:

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    Its been a while but I’ve now done the measured out drawings of the ironless door I posted earlier. It benefited from Don’s input to the point that I worked up isometric views of the exploded and assembled views. I also did straight elevations. I hope these convey an understanding of how the door was made and hung.

    Hopefully we’ll publish the results but the colleague that will do the write up of the building is notoriously slow. 😥

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    @AllanA wrote:

    … but the colleague that will do the write up of the building is notoriously slow. 😥

    Allan, I’m surrounded by ’em 🙄

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    The colleague is so slow he still hasn’t written it up, but has left our organisation to wor for another, so its likely thedrawings will stand alone for ever. 😳

    Don Coe
    Don Coe
    Keymaster

    The colleague is so slow he still hasn’t written it up, 😮

    Over three years and all you can say about him is that he’s slow?

    Dead from the neck up is more likely!

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    You should see the list of important sites he left behind, unfinished. Adored by his superiors, loathed by a number of his colleagues. Not for nothing did we refer to him as Teflon Man.

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