This topic contains 19 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by Emma Cook Emma Cook 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    I Haven’t posted any drawings for a while so here are some done quite recently. Yet another one of Loftus Town Hall but in pencil this time.
    Comments Very welcome 🙂

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    Nice tonal effects and well observed details, I like the statue’s head. I think a few of the vanishing points particularly on the first and last images are a bit to extreme and give an unnatural feel to them, but I like the slight showing of the construction lines.

    Pencil is very much Allan’s medium, I wonder what he thinks?

    Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    Thanks Tim, I agree, I wasn’t sure whether to put the last one on or not because I wasn’t happy with it! The first one i agree also looks unnatural, I think it’s because there is a slight incline on both of the roads which I was trying to show, but wasn’t very successful 😐

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    I agree with Tim, you have acheived some good tonal effects. Perhaps in the Loftus drawing your shading of the road is a bit heavy; a lighter tone on it would make the building take centre stage. It might also lessen the effect of distortion to the perspective which the incline creates.

    Your station drawing works pretty well given the compexity of the facade. You could perhaps try using a lighter touch with the pencil? I use a fairly hard pencil as lightly as possible to set out the main parts. That way errors can played down at a later stage with darker tones or lines.

    Hope this helps, lovely to see your work.

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    There is a great book “drawing in pencil” I think, by Arthur Guptill. Which has good examples of what Allan describes – making the building stand out. A lot of libraries used to have it and the reprint is not too expensive. Well worth a look.

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    Alan Whittle
    Participant

    I find getting the balance of light & dark on a pencil sketch is a rewarding thing when it goes well. It can really lift & define an image. I have been guilty of over darkening roads in the past & also not getting enough contrast.

    A day or so ago I noticed a pencil sketch from urban sketcher Marc Holmes where he had spent an afternoon sketching classical statues. For me it is a great sketch/study sheet. Here is a link should you wish to have a look

    http://www.urbansketchers.org/2013/01/a-relaxing-afternoon-at-museum.html?m=1

    I have enjoyed seeing your images on here Emma, they are good studies & have reminded me I should spend some time with my pencils & rest the pen for a while 😉

    Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    Quick sketch design for a new balcony.

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    Nice, you’ve handled the perspective well on this one. :clap:

    Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    Thank you Tim, 🙂 It was actually free hand as well with no construction lines, they are usually the ones that go terribly wrong. 🙄
    How do you go about getting your sketches on to the computer? Scanning or photographing? With pencil sketches especially I always feel that they lose a lot of the tonal qualities in the process. I did plan to email the client a series of sketches for this project, but I settled for posting as the quality just wasn’t there.

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    I always scan provided its small enough but pencil is very tricky. Depends what scanner you have, Canon ones have an auto tone button that you have to turn off or it polarises everything, if you fiddle with the settings you can get a reasonable result. If you photograph it you need bright even light and again quite a lot of fiddling about with the settings.

    Allan does a lot of pencil stuff and gets it really well reproduced, some is on here and a lot is on his Flickr page as well. Try asking him how he does it.

    Avatar
    Gareth Hughes
    Participant

    Nice drawings. When scanning the illustration use the curves option in the scanner menu and Photoshop(or Corel)..Image/Adjustment/Curves..it gives you much more control being able to select the various tones…better than the brightness/contrast option.

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    Nice sketches Emma.

    I usually scan my drawings using an Epson scanner (an A4 one at home, A3 one at work)into Photoshop. I tend to scan at 300dpi, greyscale, which is good enough for printing and tend not to reduce the resolution for the computer though that is an option for using less memory.

    Once scanned I tend to adjust the tones uusing levels in Photoshop, usually moving the mid tones up a bit and leaving the darks where they are. If the paper gets smudged a lot I move the move white up a bit. Its also possible to lighten and darken small areas with the burn and dodge tool but I prefer not to do this as its better to get the pencil drawing right in the first place.

    Hope this helps.

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    By way a sample here one I did recently. Scanned at 300dpi and saved at full size, A4 roughly, its still quite big. For SAI forum its has been resized to 999 pixels wide and 200dpi, then saved as alower resolution jpg file. The original size scan is on my Flickr page
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/56545646@N07/

    The file size difference is quite large. What you can do is email your client the lower resolution files until all is agreed and then send a higher resolution files when it isall agreed to be complete.

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    Gareth Hughes
    Participant
    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    Thanks for the shortcut to the tutorial. I have given it a go but it will some time to master it. the control is greater than it is in Levels but I find the levels so much simpler… 😕

    Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    I’ve not posted anything on here for a while, so here are a couple of fairly recent sketches from my sketch book..

    Chris Lock
    Chris Lock
    Participant

    The priory could IMO do with more clarification; is it made of plastic, brick, wedding cake icing, or heavy stone? In places it looks like a bit of each. I think if you can catch the essence of what the building is made of you’d have a much more powerful drawing.

    You’ve actually reminded me of when I received a grade 9 for my first GCE art exam! I drew the flowers, but they actually looked more like porcelean than live flowers, so I don’t think they convinced the examiner at all. Don’t be disheartened by the comment/advice above. On my next attempt I passed with grade 1. Sometimes I think drawing is a bit like maths; it either has it or it doesn’t. It needs to be convincing to life.

    Your upper sketch has the heavy quality associated with the subject and works much better. The priory is perhaps a delicate structure, but it is also made of hard rock or stone and weighs a ton, despite its looks. This makes it a more challenging subject to reproduce convincingly.

    Haivng said this, I’ve only done one drawing in 35 years so I don’t know why I have the gaul to give you advice. So do disregard it if you wish. These comments were actually what my art teacher at senior school shared with me almost 1/2 a century ago.

    Allan T Adams
    Allan T Adams
    Participant

    I’d go along with Chris to a degree, Emma. The industrial scene works because yu have managed the massing very well, the clouds of steam etc behind it helps this by pushing the structure forward and giving iit something to compare with.

    The priory drawing has the correct proportions but I would go back over it with some heavier working to reinforce the massing. Perhaps a softer, darker pencil would help or even some pen work and wash.

    Don’t be put off is the main thing. We all made similar drawings to begin with; I still do despite years of practice.

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    I like the industrial one too, good subject and composition. If it were my drawing I’d be tempted to do a watercolour wash over the priory one, maybe just two tones of warm grey. I find it really helps strengthen a drawing.

    Emma Cook
    Emma Cook
    Participant

    Thanks for your comments.
    I’ve added pen and wash to a copy of the priory drawing – kept the original so I can work on it again if I want to. Was only done quick, so could be better.

    Tim Richardson
    Tim Richardson
    Keymaster

    No I like it, much more punchy. Stick that next to the original and look which has the most impact! :clap:

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